Sign In
Skip to content
Attention: We are updating our website to better serve Alaska. Please let us know if you experience difficulties navigating our webpages or accessing our information.



Print your own set of Alaskan ACE Cards

Each suite of cards can be printed on card stock such as Avery – Name Badge Insert Refills (item number 5392). These 3”x4” cards are perforated and when printed as double sided lead to easy to distribute ACE cards.

Diamonds
Hearts

Spades
Clubs

 








<<<Back to home

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Cards

These cards were developed to help Alaskans learn about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and how to overcome them. While, ACEs are common here in Alaska many people have overcome a difficult childhood to thrive as adults. What supports allowed them to succeed? ACE Cards are divided into four categories: 

 
 
 

The Costs: These cards point to the economic, social and health costs which are linked to adverse experiences before age 18. 

The Data: These cards illustrate the numbers of ACEs and outcomes related to them, specific to Alaskan adults.

Resiliency: Cards in this group refer to how people are strengthened in their communities through supportive people and programs which help prevent and mitigate ACEs and their poor outcomes.

The Work: For many years Alaskans have helped each other in their day to day relationships, whether it by a grandparent, the Big Brother/Big Sister Program, a community behavioral health center or an understanding employer, these relationships make a difference. These cards highlight these activities.

Of course, not all the costs, data, resiliency or work is included on these cards. Everyone can contribute to their neighbors and family in their own way. These are available to get the conversation going. Click on a card that interests you and learn more.

Most of the Alaska specific data, in these cards was developed from results of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey, which included questions about adverse childhood experiences of Alaskan Adults.